Landscaping! 2

I am thrilled at the work C. Jai has done on the lawn and garden here at Wise Manor!  My amaryllis now have a bed of their own and are prepping for a spring display.  The camillias C. Jai planted are in full flower and the azaleas and crape myrtles are gathering strength for their own spring spectacle.  I have a new flashy Shumard red oak to replace the three ancient pecans I lost to the drought, and I have a private little “garden room” outside my back door with a bubbling fountain and display plants.  My “iron plants” have been moved to the gap between the car port and the house to hide my ageing foundation (how prophetic!).  I’ve been gathering royal blue pots for highlighting and have begun to hang interesting architectural items on the new privacy fence.  We have a few more smaller projects to complete (lighting, statuary) but for now we are weathering the fall/winter months until my new garden’s first spring–can hardly wait!  COME SEE!

Fence history

We have halted work on the exterior of Wise Manor for a while as Glenn takes care of an ailing grandmother and sees to his other customers.  We still have serveral things to accomplish, such as installing the new window in the old location, making and inserting the new gable ornament, resurfacing the driveway, painting the front fence, etc., but we’ll get back to them in good time.  Glenn loved the story of the fence:  Mom was town historian and kept cemetery records, as well.  Once when she was copying information from gravestones in Oakwood Cemetery for her records, she noticed a work crew taking down an ornamental fence from around a family’s grave site.  “What are you going to do with that fence?’ she asked.  “Haul it off,” was the answer.  “Haul it up to my house,” she said.  And that’s the story of the fence that stretches across the front of the house and the answer to why there’s only that much of it.  Some of the fleur-de-lis were missing from the top which is probably why the family decided to discard it, but Mom had a local welder cut and attach some rough shapes which the eye does not see because the whole fence is painted black.  While Glenn and I were scratching around in “old stuff” in the cupboard, he found some of the broken-off fleur-de-lis and told me that he could re-attach them.  We’ll do that before we re-paint the fence.  By the way, the fence was cast here in Jefferson, where there were once two flourshing iron founderies due to the abundance of iron ore found locally.  Alas!  they are now long gone, as are the river boats.